Chris Muir's Day By Day

Friday, November 28, 2014

10H

John Derbyshire's Rules, #10H: "Do not act the Good Samaritan to blacks in apparent distress, e.g., on the highway."

Unfortunately for Andres Alberto Martinez Trouch, he either didn't know the rule, or chose not to follow it, with tragic consequences.

Rest in peace. Your intent was noble, but its subject was unworthy.

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Meanwhile, In New Jersey...

and I'm not talking the NY-suburb "You talkin' to me?" New Jersey, but backwoods Pine Barrens New Jersey, an Indian (not Hiawatha) out with his friends met a bear, and proved the slowest of his group in the chase that ensued.

Thus once again proving the adage Stay fit and carry a .44 Magnum.

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

When the MSM Collaborates In Conspiracy To Murder

No other way to explain this, is there?

New York Times Publishes Darren Wilson’s Address Info As Ferguson Simmers.

The public's right to know? Really?

Apparently, just to make things easier, Slate has even published a photograph of Wilson's house.

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Treasure Blog: Ivan the Terrible's Sword?

Maybe.

A medieval sword found buried under a birch tree in Siberia may have belonged to Ivan the Terrible, archaeologists have claimed.

The rare 12th century blade, discovered in 1975 and nicknamed Siberia's Excalibur, was found three kilometres from where the lieutenant of a Cossack leader favoured by the tsar is thought to have died.

Until now the sword had been considered a spoil of war, but a new theory suggests it could have may have been a gift from the leader to Ermak Timofeyevich, and passed along to Ivan Koltso.


Pic:



The article later describes it as a "a massive sword, about a metre long with a typical iron hilt of medieval knight's swords with a clearly expressed crossbar guard and tripartite pommel."

It's a Viking-style sword. The Russians were part Viking in their ancestry.

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Arrival

Retired my old watch after 20+ years, purchased a very similar watch from the same company, L.L. Bean:



Field watch. I have definite prejudices about watches. I want high contrast between the hands and the face for easy reading, I want a date window, and I want a 50's-style expansion band for comfort and easy on/off. Band on this new one is aftermarket, the watch came from Bean's with a leather band. This one is upsized a bit at 42mm, which makes it easier to read with my aging eyes. Let's hope it gives the sort of exemplary service its predecessor did.

Monday, November 17, 2014

I've Heard This Song Before

Tin soldiers and Nixon's coming...

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon signed an executive order activating the Missouri National Guard on Monday afternoon.

According to a news release, the role of the National Guard is to “…support law enforcement during any period of unrest that might occur following the grand jury’s decision concerning the investigation into the death of Michael Brown.”

“As part of our ongoing efforts to plan and be prepared for any contingency, it is necessary to have these resources in place in advance of any announcement of the grand jury’s decision,” Nixon said in the release.


Another "Lost Colony" In Georgia?

Melilot.

A long-forgotten letter, discovered in early November of 2014 by regional planner and historian, Michael Jacobs, has provided very significant collaborating evidence that an English colony thrived in what is now northeast Metro Atlanta throughout the 17th century. Jacobs is Senior Regional Planner at the South Georgia Regional Commission in Waycross, GA.

The seven page letter was written on January 6, 1660 in perfect Renaissance French by Edward Graves (Graeves) a member of the board of directors of the colony, to the Rev. Charles de Rochefort, a French Protestant minister living in exile in Rotterdam, Holland. De Rochefort’s commentary on the letter said that Graves held a Doctor of Law and lived in Melilot within the Apalache Kingdom. The ruins of Melilot are probably located at Little Mulberry River Park in Gwinnett County, GA.


Apparently some survivors of Sir Walter Raleigh's Roanoke Colony made their way to Melilot. Also interesting is that the dominant Indian tribes of the region during that time period - - the Apalache - - were related to the Maya of Central America.

Read the whole thing for a lesson in forgotten history. H/T Free North Carolina.