Chris Muir's Day By Day

Friday, November 04, 2011

He's More Concerned With His Golf Handicap, For One

President Obama says that the 2012 presidential election is "the least of my concerns."

He's probably due for another vacation, too.

9 comments:

wally said...

I don't suppose it matters that he hasn't taken nearly as many vacation days as Bush. Yeah, I didn't think so.

Bob said...

@wally: He's only served three years so far, Walt. Bush served a full eight. Let's see how it totals out after either four (we can divide by two to get an estimate of how many he'd have taken in eight) or eight.

And for someone that chides me constantly for using the tu quoque argument, you seem to use it a lot yourself.

wally said...

I chose Bush as his immediate predecessor, not as a tu quoque argument. IMO, being President is incredibly demanding, and they deserve any time off they can manage. According to factcheck.org--I think it was them--Obama's vacation time is in line with all other recent Presidents, and considerably less than Bush's--adjusted for relative time served. I'm not so stupid that I would compare three years to eight, Bob.

wally said...

And just to be querulous, it's "someone who", not "someone that".

wally said...

My point is, there are several justifiable bases for criticizing Obama, and I would even join you in a few. Why stoop to Fox-like pointless and false snipes?

Bob said...

@wally: when you start becoming a grammar Nazi, you're flailing a bit, Walt. What's next, publicly pointing out my typos?

I'd be less inclined to criticize Obama's golf jones if the MSM hadn't used golf to bludgeon Bush as uncaring. The famous juxtaposition of coffins arriving at Dover with Bush saying "Now watch this drive" was a low blow even by MSM standards.

wally said...

You and your tu quoque arguments :)

Querulous, yes. Flailing, no. And I have already pointed out typos, and will continue to do so. No need to thank me. I consider it a public service.

Bob said...

@wally: [sic]:

Sic—generally inside square brackets, [sic], and occasionally parentheses, (sic)—when added just after a quote or reprinted text, indicates the passage appears exactly as in the original source. The usual purpose is to inform readers that any errors or apparent errors in the copied material are not from transcription—that they are reproduced exactly from the original writer or printer. A bracketed sic may also be used as a form of ridicule or as a humorous comment, typically by drawing attention to the original writer's mistakes.

Typical Leftist tactic. Pointing out typos and grammar errors falls into the same category, especially when applied selectively.

wally said...

A bracketed sic is a typical leftist tactic? You are a truly funny man, Robert.